Impact of SADTU protest on education


Spokesperson Panyaza Lesufi says North West is the only badly affected province with 224 teachers absent.
"There are only two provinces affected, Gauteng especially - components of the far east of Pretoria as well as Western Cape where we expect a march.  There are principals in parts of North West that decided to close some schools, six to be precise but our team is working on dealing with the situation but overall the department wants to applaud parents for their support in ensuring that their children are taken to school," says Lesufi.

Meanwhile, it was reported earlier that the Sadtu march in Pretoria has been delayed, the marchers are said to be waiting for their fellow members who are travelling in buses from other provinces.
The members were expected to start marching at 11am, but many are still arriving in small numbers.
Protesters were chanting freedom songs and dancing peacefully while the police kept a watchful eye.
While there were not that many protesters at the old PUTCO bus depot that did not dampen the spirits of Sadtu members that were already there ahead of their protest to the Union Buildings.

Protesters were chanting freedom songs and dancing peacefully while the police kept a watchful eye.
According to Sadtu general secretary Nkosana Dolopi, buses on their way are stuck in traffic and are expected to arrive any time soon.
In Cape Town, things seems to be picking up some steam as scores of teachers and learners begun gathering at the Cape Town City Centre ahead of a planned Sadtu march.

Learners from Nyanga, a township in Cape Town say they support their teachers' call for better pay and working conditions. They added that the strike will not affect their mid-term exams.
The protesters will march to Parliament where they will hand over a memorandum of demands.

Source: SABCNews